Undergraduate Courses

**See bottom of this page for a list of courses by sub field.  

Winter 2018 Course Offerings (subject to change without notice):

  • PS 1 – Intro to Political Philosophy - Dr. Norris
  • PS 12 – Intro to American Politics - Dr. Smith
  • PS 15 – Intro to Research Methods - Prof. Nomikos
  • PS 106MI - Special Topics: "Military Politics" (CP/IR) - Dr. Ahuja  [Open to full POLS majors ONLY]  We often limit our views of militaries as war making machines used in interstate conflicts. And yet, militaries are also prominent actors in a state's domestic politics. They employ a large workforce, globally 27 million people serve in the military. Militaries make a substantial claim on a state’s resources, in many instances  manage a state’s internal security, and sometimes govern the state. This course will examine a military’s role in domestic politics by drawing on a diverse set of topics, including civil-military relations in democracies and authoritarian countries, military’s role in citizen making, economic progress, nation building, and counterinsurgency.

  • PS 106ND - Special Topics: "State, Nation, Regime" (CP/IR) - STAFF [Open to full POLS majors ONLY] - The nation state is the core entity in modern international politics. Despite numerous pronunciations of its irrelevance, the state has largely endured in this role. From where did the nation state come? Why is the institutional arrangement so robust? What challenges and challengers does the nation-state face going forward? This class investigates these questions, looking at historical and contemporary examples.

  • PS 110U - Political Concepts: "The Politics of Utopia" (PT) - STAFF [Open to full POLS majors ONLY]   Envisioning utopias has been a constant in human life. Whereas such visions have often been seen purely as acts of imagination for its own sake, this course considers them as a political activity. It explores a range of texts that entail visions of utopia, from utopian fiction, to works of political theory and proposals made by past and existing social and political discourses.

 

  • PS 119JW - Ethical Issues in International Relations (PT/IR) - Dr. Digeser
  • PS 126 - International Security (IR) - Dr. Strathman
  • PS 130 - Politics of South Asia (CP) - Dr. Ahuja
  • PS 135 - Politics and Government of Japan (CP) - Dr. Freeman
  • PS 141 - Civil War (IR) - Dr. Coggins
  • PS 146 - Globalization & Politics (IR/CP) - STAFF
  • PS 161 - Minority Politics (AP) - Dr. Lien
  • PS 162 - Urban Gov't & Politics (CP - W18 ONLY) - STAFF
  • PS 172 - US Political Communication - Dr. Bimber
  • PS 173 - Comparative Media & Politics (CP) - Dr. Freeman
  • PS 175 - Politics of the Environment (AP) - STAFF
  • PS 186 - Intro to International Political Economy (IR) - Dr. Cohen
  • PS 187 - Classical Political Theory (PT) - STAFF
  • PS 196 - Senior Seminar on Civil War (IR) - Dr. Coggins [OPEN only to Seniors]
  • PS 197B - Senior Thesis Seminar [By instructor approval ONLY]

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

 

TENTATIVE Spring Quarter 2018 Course Offerings (subject to change without notice):

  • PS 6 – Intro to Comparative Politics - Dr. Freeman
  • PS 7 – Intro to International Relations - Dr. Coggins
  • PS 12 – Intro to American Politics - Dr. Woolley
  • PS 15 – Intro to Research Methods - Dr. Mildenberger
  • PS 126 - International Security (IR) - Dr. Narang
  • PS 127 - American Foreign Policy (IR) - Dr. Strathman
  • PS 142 - Decisionmaking (IR) - Dr. Strathman
  • PS 143 – Russian Domestic Policy (CP) - Dr. Kaplan
  • PS 147 – 3rd World Politics – (CP) - Dr. Bruhn
  • PS 155/155L - Congress and Congress Lab (AP) - Dr. Smith

Special Topics  [Open to full POLS majors ONLY]

  • PS 106AT - Special Topics: American Presidency (AP) - Dr. Woolley: Many scholars have been interested in how the peculiarities of specific historical moments affect presidential performance.  We will try to examine this as well, typically by looking the president’s response to crises.  It is very standard to ask how political “context” constrains presidential choice—perhaps reducing the impact of individual traits, or perhaps magnifying the importance of those traits.
  • PS 106DP - Special Topics: Political Parties and Democracy (CP) - Mr. Allen:  Modern democracy has been deemed unthinkable save in terms of political parties. In fact, party government is found in nearly every democratic state around the world. In this class, we will explore why parties are so instrumental to democracy, how parties are created and shaped by members and leaders, and how parties campaign and govern in contemporary democratic states.
  • PS 110DT - Special Topics: Democratic Theory and Its Critics (PT) - Mr. Miller: Is democracy really the form of government? If so, what do we really mean by 'democracy'? This course will explore several varieties of contemporary democratic theory, including deliberative, agonistic, aversive, realist, and plebiscitary, as well as several works that critique democratic practice.
  • PS 106EC - Special Topics: Ethnic Conflict (IR/CP) - Mr. Nomikos: Ethnic conflicts have become the prevailing political crises of our times. This course will introduce students to the study of ethnic conflict in political science, overviewing both classics as well as more recent research in the field. We will study the sources of ethnic identification; debates about the role of ethnicity in the origins, fighting, and termination of conflict; and international intervention and peacekeeping. Students will learn about themes relating to ethnic conflict and specific countries, which they will select at the beginning of the course. Regions covered include (but are not limited to) Europe, Africa, and the Middle East. 
  • PS 106HR - Special Topics: Human Rights (IR/CP) - Ms. Bennett: This is a survey course on human rights that will analyze human rights theories, human rights in international law, institutions and politics, and examples of different kinds of human rights violations across the world. Human rights play a central role in contemporary international politics, but many aspects of human rights and their implementation remain controversial. Throughout this course we will explore answers to the following questions: What are international human rights? What are the social and political conditions that seem to cause widespread human rights violations? How are human rights best protected and fulfilled at global and national levels? What contemporary events present challenges for the protection and fulfillment of international human rights? In answering some of these questions, students will have an opportunity to develop an independent research paper on a human rights issue of their choosing.
  • PS 106LPSpecial Topics: Latino Politics (AP): Ms. Rivas-Pineda:  This course is a comprehensive, high-level introduction to the political causes and consequences of Latino migration to (and presence in) the United States. Specifically, the course will focus on these immigrants, present day political attitudes and behavior through available survey data, and the historical, institutional and political conditions that factor in to these attitudes. The course will also help students develop basic qualitative and quantitative tools to study of the political attitudes and behavior of Latinos and other immigrant communities in the US.
  • PS 106MO - Special Topics: International Political Economy of Money (IR) - Dr. Cohen: The focus of this course is on the politics of international monetary relations.  The main aim is to help students learn how to understand and evaluate the current functioning of money and finance in the global economy.  The first three weeks of the course are devoted to the historical development of the international monetary system up to the present day.  The remaining weeks will address a range of contemporary issues in monetary relations, with particular emphasis on politics at both the domestic and international levels of analysis.
  • PS 106NG - Special Topics: Negotiations (AP/IR) - Dr. Stokes:  This course focuses on negotiation in theory and practice. It uses lectures and hands-on exercises in class to build students’ skills. It draws on research on negotiation, with a focus on applying these ideas to political contexts and institutions. It will also help build practical skills in communication, leadership and decision-making.
  • PS 106PK - Special Topics: "Peacemaking/Peacebuilding" (IR) - Mr. Nomikos 
    The international community devotes considerable financial and human resources to preventing civil wars from breaking out and stopping them once they do. Do such attempts succeed? In this course, we examine international efforts to create sustainable peace after civil wars from a variety of perspectives. Drawing upon theoretical and empirical analyses in Political Science, we investigate the effectiveness of peacekeeping troops deployed to keep warring parties from fighting as well as statebuilding initiatives that attempt to construct or re-construct domestic institutions in a post-conflict state. We also consider the spatial challenges peacekeeping operations, which may prevent certain operations from succeeding locally where they've succeeded nationally. Finally, we examine different types of peacekeepers, including the United Nations's extensive network of peacekeeping operations around the globe.
  • PS 110DT - Special Topics: Democratic Theory and Its Critics (PT) - Mr. Miller: Is democracy really the form of government? If so, what do we really mean by 'democracy'? This course will explore several varieties of contemporary democratic theory, including deliberative, agonistic, aversive, realist, and plebiscitary, as well as several works that critique democratic practice.
  • PS 110S - Political Concepts: "Modernity and the Slaughterhouse: Violence, Labor, and Animals in Contemporary Society" (PT) - Prof. Dutkiewicz:   Steven Pinker open his influential bestseller The Better Angels of Our Nature with the claim that “If the past is a foreign country, it is a shockingly violent one,” going on to argue that the contemporary age is one marked by relatively more peace and less violence than ever before. Drawing on a long tradition of optimist thinkers, he credits this civilizational progress to a combination of the intellectual legacy of Enlightenment humanism, greater faith in scientific rationality and technological progress, a strong system of states and social institutions, and the development of the liberal market economy. For Pinker, this account holds as much for humans as it does for animals, and he goes so far as to claim the emergence of animal rights as “another rights revolution” akin to civil rights and women’s rights. But does this account of modern society hold up under scrutiny? Or, more specifically, where does it fail? How exactly does contemporary society relate to different forms of violence?

 

  • PS 197C Honors Thesis Seminar (Enrollment by Instructor Approval ONLY)

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Fall 2017 Course Offerings:

  • PS 1 - Intro to Political Philosophy - Dr. Digeser
  • PS 6 – Intro to Comparative Politics - Dr. Bruhn
  • PS 7 – Intro to International Relations - Dr. Narang
  • PS 15 – Intro to Research Methods - Dr. Stokes
  • PS 106LC - Special Topics: Legacies of Colonialism (IR/CP) - STAFF.  "Legacies of Colonialism: Conflict, Development, and Identity"

    Although the globe-spanning European colonial empires of centuries past are now mostly gone, societies around the world continue to deal with the aftermath of their dominion. In this course, students will learn about the diverse legacies of Western colonialism through the lens of analytical political science. We will review how colonialism has shaped post-colonial identity politics, development outcomes, and modern conflicts. The course will focus primarily on Sub-Saharan Africa but will also discuss other parts of the world, including Latin America, Southeast Asia, South Asia, and the Middle East.  [Open to full POLS majors ONLY]
  • PS 116 - Politics of Electoral Laws(CP) - STAFF
  • PS 121 - International Politics (IR) - Dr. Strathman
  • PS 124 - International Organizations (IR) - Ms. Natasha Bennett
  • PS 126 - International Security (IR) - Dr. Strathman
  • PS 137 – Politics of Economic Development (CP) - Dr. Ahuja
  • PS 153 – Political Interest Groups (AP) - Dr. Han
  • PS 157 – American Presidency – (AP) - Dr. Woolley
  • PS 160 – Asian American Politics (AP) - Dr. Lien
  • PS 162 - Urban Politics (AP) - STAFF
  • PS 177 - Comparative Environmental Politics (CP) - Dr. Mildenberger
  • PS 188 - Modern Political Theory (PT) - Dr. Norris
  • PS 189 - Contemporary Political Theory (PT) - STAFF
  • PS 196 - Senior Seminar (PT) "Readings in American Political Philosophy" - Dr. Norris
  • PS 196 - Senior Seminar (CP) "Comparative Immigration Policy" - Dr. Bruhn
  • PS 197A– Senior Honors Thesis Seminar (Approval by Instructor Only) - McDonnell

 

---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

Summer 2017 Course Offerings:

Session A:

  • PS 1 - Intro to Political Philosophy
  • PS 6 - Intro to Comparative Politics
  • PS 7 – Intro to International Relations
  • PS 151 - Voting & Elections (AP)
  • PS 154 - Public Opinion (AP/PT)
  • PS W157 - American Presidency - Dr. Woolley ON LINE COURSE
  • PS 158 - Power in Washington (AP)
  • PS 173 - Media and Politics in a Comparative Perspective (CP)

Session B:

  • PS 12 - Intro to American Government
  • PS 15 – Intro to Research Methods - Dr. Stoll
  • PS 105 - Comparative Politics Theories (CP/IR)
  • PS 106RP - Special Topics: Religion and Politics (AP)
  • PS W121 - International Politics (IR) - Dr. Coggins ON LINE COURSE
  • PS 143 - Russian Domestic Policy (CP)
  • PS 189 - Contemporary Political Theory (PT)

 

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

 

COURSES BY SUB FIELD: 

[These are the default subfield classifications of courses appearing in the general course catalog.  Not all courses automatically apply towards major requirements and may need to be petitioned.  You may petition for a different subfield classification if you feel that it is justified based on the course content. Please see the bottom of the "Major Requirements" page of this website for a downloadable "Course Petition" form.]

  • AMERICAN POLITICS:
  • 106AT
  • 106EP (also CP)
  • 106IL
  • 106IP ((Replaced by 166 eff. S17)
  • 106IV
  • 106LP
  • 106MM (Replaced by 156)
  • 106PO
  • 106RP
  • 115
  • 151
  • 152
  • 153
  • 154 (AP/PT)
  • 155 & 155L
  • 156
  • 157 & W157
  • 158
  • 160 [Cross-listed with Asian American Studies as AS AM 160]
  • 161
  • 162 (also CP in W18)
  • 165
  • 166 (Replaces 106IP eff. S17)
  • 170
  • 171 (AP/CP)
  • 172 (Replaces 171 eff. M17)
  • 175 [Cross-listed with Environmental Studies as ENV S 178]
  • 180
  • 182
  • 185

 

  • COMPARATIVE POLITICS:
  • 101
  • 105 (Also IR)
  • 106BP
  • 106DP
  • 106EA
  • 106EC
  • 106ED
  • 106EP (also AP)
  • 106HR (also IR)
  • 106LC (also IR)
  • 106MI (also IR)
  • 106ND (also IR)
  • 106SM (Replaced by 117 eff. W18)
  • 108 (also PT)
  • 109
  • 116
  • 117 (Replaces 106SM eff. W18)
  • 118
  • 128
  • 130
  • 132
  • 134
  • 135
  • 136
  • 137
  • 138
  • 143
  • 144 (also IR)
  • 145 (also IR)
  • 146 (also IR)
  • 147
  • 148A & B
  • 149
  • 150A & B
  • 162 (also AP in W18)
  • 173 (Replaces 171 eff. M17)
  • 177

 

  • INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS:
  • 105 (Also CP)
  • 106DM (Replaced by 142 eff. S17)
  • 106CW (Replaced by 141 eff. S17)
  • 106HR (also CP)
  • 106LC (also CP)
  • 106LR (also CP)
  • 106MI (also CP)
  • 106ND (also CP)
  • 106PK
  • 106UN
  • 119 (all – also PT)
  • 121 & W121
  • 124
  • 126
  • 127
  • 141 (Replaces 106CW eff. S17)
  • 142 (Replaces 106DM eff. S17)
  • 144 (also CP)
  • 145 (also CP) [Cross-listed with Italian as ITAL 161AX]
  • 146 (also CP)
  • 186 [Cross-listed with Global Studies as GLOBL 123]

 

  • POLITICAL THEORY:
  • 108 (also CP)
  • 110 (all)
  • 114 [Cross-listed with Chicano Studies as CH ST 179]
  • 119 (all – also IR)
  • 154 (also AP)
  • 187
  • 188
  • 189